Jones & Collins Astoria Hot Eight - Biltmore 1001 (Originally Victor 38576) (1929)

Still waiting for their original New Orleans recordings on Victor and Bluebird to fall into my lap...so until then, this Biltmore bootleg will suffice nicely.

From wikipedia...

The Jones & Collins Astoria Hot Eight were led by cornetist Lee Collins and tenor saxophonist David Jones. They took their name from the Astoria Gardens, the dance hall room of the Astoria Hotel on Rampart Street in New Orleans where they were the house band in 1928 and 1929. The group included a number of noted New Orleans jazz musicians in its relatively short life.

The ensemble recorded only once, doing a session at the Italian Hall in New Orleans on December 15, 1929. A total of four sides were released from these sessions: Astoria Strut b/w Duet Stomp, issued on Victor Records, and Damp Weather b/w Tip Easy Blues, issued on Bluebird Records. Alternative takes of Damp Weather and Tip Easy Blues survived to appear on reissues decades later.

Lee Collins c / Sidney Arodin cl / Theodore Purnell as / David Jones ts / Joe Robechaux p / Emmanuel Sayles bj / Al Morgan sb, v / Joe Strode-Raphael d.

Recorded in New Orleans on November 15, 1929.



Jelly Roll Morton - Victor 21064 (1927)

Excerpted from wikipedia...

Morton returned to Chicago in 1923 to claim authorship of his recently published rag, "The Wolverines", which had become a hit as "Wolverine Blues" in the Windy City. He released the first of his commercial recordings, first as piano rolls, then on record, both as a piano soloist and with various jazz bands.

In 1926, Morton succeeded in getting a contract to record for the largest and most prestigious company in the United States, Victor. This gave him a chance to bring a well-rehearsed band to play his arrangements in Victor's Chicago recording studios. These recordings by Jelly Roll Morton & His Red Hot Peppers are regarded as classics of 1920s jazz. The Red Hot Peppers featured such other New Orleans jazz luminaries as Kid Ory, Omer Simeon, George Mitchell, Johnny St. Cyr, Barney Bigard, Johnny Dodds, Baby Dodds, and Andrew Hilaire. Jelly Roll Morton & His Red Hot Peppers were one of the first acts booked on tours by MCA.

Jelly Roll Morton p / Johnny Dodds cl / Baby Dodds d.

Recorded at Oak Street Studio in Chicago on June 10, 1927.



Arcadia Peacock Orchestra Of St. Louis - Okeh 40044 (1924)

Here's trumpeter, Bob Pope, before joining the Coon-Sanders Nighthawks and also leading his own North Carolina based band more than a decade later.

Jack Ford vn, dir / Bob Pope t / Tommy Moore tb / Bud Hassler, Bill Schmidt cl, as / Jules Schneider cl, ts / Al Carsella pac / Eddie Ward p / Porter Brown bj / Chick Harvey bb / Marty Gardner d.

Recorded in St. Louis in January, 1924.


Rev. J.M. Gates - Herwin 92035 (1926)

From wikipedia...

The Reverend J.M. Gates (July 14, 1884 – August 18, 1945) was an American Christian preacher and Gospel music singer.

From 1914 to his death, Gates was the pastor of Mount Calvary Baptist Church in Rock Dale Park, Atlanta, Georgia. He had a very prolific recording career, recording over 200 sides between 1926 and 1941, including frequent rerecordings. Experts estimate that at least a quarter of all sermons commercially released on record before 1943 were recorded by Gates.

His first best-seller, 1926's "Death's Black Train Is Coming", sold 35,000 copies by the end of its release year. Many of his recordings were strong warnings of the hellish punishments that awaited sinners.

Gates is credited with introducing the gospel music of former blues artist Thomas A. Dorsey into the black gospel market via his crusades. His funeral drew the largest crowd of any memorial service in the city before Martin Luther King, Jr. In addition to a Columbia Records collection and a "complete works" set from Document Records, Gates' work has been frequently featured in gospel and roots music anthologies, including Harry Smith's influential Anthology of American Folk Music.

Herwin Records was an American independent record label founded and run by brothers Herbert and Edwin Schiele, the trademark name being formed from their first names (HERbert and EdWIN).

Herwin Records was based in St. Louis, Missouri, and produced records starting in 1924. Most of the material released on the label was from master discs leased from Gennett Records and Paramount Records. In 1930 Herwin was sold to the Wisconsin Chair Company, the parent of Paramount Records, which discontinued the Herwin label.

Recorded in New York in August, 1926.



King Oliver's Creole Jazz Band - Brunswick 02200 (Originally Gennett 5132 & 5133) (1923)

Fresh off the riverboat up from New Orleans, here we have young Louis Armstrong from his very first recording session (plus a tune from the following day).

These are obviously reissues and was curious about the distortion at the beginning of Dipper Mouth Blues. No visual anomaly that would lend to the sound can be seen on the playing surface (The record is virtually blemish free and shiny). Could it have been from whatever master source that was used by Brunswick?

King Oliver, Louis Armstrong c / Honore Dutrey tb / Johnny Dodds cl / Lil Hardin p / Bill Johnson bj, v / Baby Dodds d.

Recorded in Richmond, IN on April 5 (Canal Street Blues) & 6 (Dipper Mouth Blues, aka Sugar Foot Stomp), 1923.